There's a lot going on everyday at Animal Wellness Centers. Stay in the know about news, upcoming events, and read our Ask the Vet columns all right here!

Archives

Recent Articles

Twitter...

Posting tweet...

Watch this video and save lives by liking Animal Wellness Foundations on Facebook


The Animal Wellness Foundation, Animal Wellness Center’s non-profit sister organization, saves dogs and cats from the worst kill shelters as well as found stray dogs and cats in southern California. They also treat the dogs and cats of the homeless for no charge. John Mackey, the Co-Founder of Whole Foods, has generously offered to donate $1 for every “Like” on the Animal Wellness Foundation Facebook page. PLEASE GO TO THE FACEBOOK PAGE AND PRESS “LIKE.” Every $1 counts so please do it now and save lives.

Thanks Ethan Woldenberg and John Woldenberg for this awesome video to help spread the word!

Professional Anesthetic Dental Cleanings at AWC


Did you know periodontal disease is the most common disease in cats and dogs over the age of 3?

Let us professionally clean, polish, radiograph, and assess your pet’s teeth and oral cavity to treat and prevent further dental disease!

Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and quality of life. There are serious potential local and systemic consequences from periodontal disease including pain, tooth root abscesses, loss of teeth, loss of tooth-supporting bone, liver, kidney, and heart valve disease, weight loss, and decreased appetite. Please call Animal Wellness Centers at 310-450-7387.(PETS) for more details.

*Pre-dental exam and pre-anesthetic blood are required prior to scheduling dental procedure.

Dr. Annie Harvilicz and her team of veterinary medicine professionals are revolutionizing animal healthcare with her forward-thinking integrative approach to health and wellness. The Animal Wellness flagship veterinarian hospital in Venice – Marina del Rey, Los Angeles, is a state-of-the-art clinic designed from the ground up with your pets’ perspective in mind. Learn more here.

 

 

Protect Your Pets – Get Them Microchipped


As we begin the new year, we are reminded of what we need to do to change for the better.  We are also reminded of who and what we hold near and dear to our hearts. This includes our furry loved ones.  Every year, there is an increase in pet theft and as we learn that this disgraceful crime is on the rise, we must take measures to keep our pets safe.

The American Kennel Club tracked 432 pet thefts in 2011, compared to 255 in 2010. That’s about an 85 percent increase! While some animals are snatched from their yards or during home invasions, opportunistic thieves most commonly steal dogs left in cars or tied up outside stores, much like this incident recorded a couple of weeks ago on surveillance camera.  Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Marley, was shown being overwrought and then taken by a stranger in New York City.  7-year-old owner Mia Bendrat was devastated about her missing dog that was gone just a day before Christmas.  Thankfully, Marley was microchipped and returned to Mia after being sold to a woman who thought the deal was odd.

Unfortunately, the American Kennel Club has seen a rise of dognappings in shelters, which means safe zones for animals are now very limited.  There are many of ways to protect your animal, most important being microchipping. Here are important measures to consider to make sure your pet is safe from dognapping.

Protect Your Pet
Avoid becoming a victim of this heartbreaking crime!

  • Obviously, it’s best to leave your dog at home but if you insist on bringing your pet when running errands around town, visit pet-friendly establishments.
  • Keep a close eye on your pet in designated off-leash areas, where he/she could become a target for criminals looking to make a quick buck. (Pet thieves often try to resell—or even hold for ransom—stolen dogs.)
  • Avoid leaving your pet unattended in the front yard, especially if your lawn is exposed or accessible.
  • The same rules apply for leaving your pet tied up outside a store. In addition to being vulnerable to theft and teasing, your dog might escape or get injured.
  • Microchip your pet! Microchipping can often mean the difference between temporary and permanent separation from your furry friends.

If you are interested in microchipping your pet, call Animal Wellness Centers at 310-450-7537(PETS) to schedule an appointment for a complete check up and discuss microchip options.

Dr. Annie Harvilicz and her team of veterinary medicine professionals are revolutionizing animal healthcare with her forward-thinking integrative approach to health and wellness. The Animal Wellness flagship veterinarian hospital in Venice – Marina del Rey, Los Angeles, is a state-of-the-art clinic designed from the ground up with your pets’ perspective in mind. Learn more here.

Living with Urban Coyotes


 

There have been a handful of coyote sightings on the Westside lately. Are you concerned about them being in your neighborhood and worried about how to protect your pets? Want to learn tips for keeping coyotes out of your yard and neighborhood? Or are you a coyote advocate that would like to help restore peace between coyotes, people, and pets?

If so, please join us and the Humane Society for one of their free “Living with Urban Coyotes” seminars in southern California! There are three sessions:

1. Tuesday, August 14, at 7 p.m. in Huntington Beach»

2. Thursday, August 16, at 1:30 p.m. in Long Beach»

3. Thursday, August 16, at 6:30 p.m. in Long Beach»

If you’re concerned about coyotes and would like to learn how to prevent them from coming into your space and harming your pets and loved ones,  reserve your space now»

Dr. Annie Harvilicz and her team of veterinary medicine professionals are revolutionizing animal healthcare with her forward-thinking integrative approach to health and wellness. The Animal Wellness flagship veterinarian hospital in Venice – Marina del Rey, Los Angeles, is a state-of-the-art clinic designed from the ground up with your pets’ perspective in mind. Learn more here.

Loving Moment Between Man and His Sick Dog


Some of the best moments in life happen to be with our pets.  They are nature’s stress relievers, and the time spent with them make can make us very happy. Many times these moments are captured on film.  Here’s an article from the Huffington Post by Cavan Sieczkowski who reports on photographer Hannah Stonehouse Hudson’s captured moment between friend, John Unger, and his ailing dog.

Photo by Hannah Stonehouse Hudson of Stonehouse Photography

 

Unger’s adopted dog, Schoep (pronounced “Shep”), has trouble sleeping due to arthritis.  Unger found that putting Schoep in water relaxes him and helps him go to sleep.  In these warm summer evenings, Unger has been lulling Schoep to sleep by carrying him into Lake Superior. Hannah explains:

Schoep falls asleep every night when he is carried into the lake. The buoyancy of the water soothes his arthritic bones. Lake Superior is very warm right now, so the temp of the water is perfect. I was so happy I got to capture this moment for John. By the way, John rescued Shep as an 8 month old puppy, and he’s been by his side through many adventures.

It was later reported that Unger describes Schoep as a lifesaver.  In a devastating breakup, Unger was suicidal and felt that for whatever reason, Schoep snapped him out of it.

Souce: The Huffington Post

Keep an Eye on Your Pet – Dognapping on the Rise


Dognapping On the Rise—Protect Your Pet

Pet theft is on the rise. The American Kennel Club, which has been tracking pet thefts since 2007, reported a 32% increase in dog thefts last year.

While some animals are snatched from their yards or during home invasions, opportunistic thieves most commonly steal dogs left in cars or tied up outside stores. In the ASPCA’s hometown of New York City, dognappings skyrocket every summer as pet parents take advantage of nice weather to combine dog-walking with errand-running.

 

Protect Your Pet
Avoid becoming a victim of this heartbreaking crime!

  • When running errands around town, visit pet-friendly establishments or please leave your dog at home.
  • Keep a close eye on your pet in designated off-leash areas, where he could become a target for criminals looking to make a quick buck. (Pet thieves often try to resell—or even hold for ransom—stolen dogs.)
  • Avoid leaving your pet unattended in the front yard, especially if your lawn is exposed or accessible.
  • The same rules apply for leaving your pet tied up outside a store. In addition to being vulnerable to theft and teasing, your dog might escape or get injured.
  • Microchip your pet! Microchipping can often mean the difference between temporary and permanent separation from your furry loved one.

For more important information about what to do if your pet is missing, please read ASPCA’s article on Finding a Lost Pet.

Source: ASPCA Website

Dr. Annie Harvilicz and her team of veterinary medicine professionals are revolutionizing animal healthcare with her forward-thinking integrative approach to health and wellness. The Animal Wellness flagship veterinarian hospital in Venice – Marina del Rey, Los Angeles, is a state-of-the-art clinic designed from the ground up with your pets’ perspective in mind. Learn more here.

 

Follow Us on Twitter!


 

Here’s who we follow at Animal Wellness:

 

When You Wish is the Internet’s most flexible and inexpensive platform for raising money online. Our mission: Give, Get, Connect!

Host/Reporter on Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket

For your dog’s mind, body, and bowl!

Had I followed my first love, I’d have been a professional baseball player, but a friend told me some one with a flair for the dramatic, should consider acting.

Publicist with 15 years experience focusing on businesses and nonprofits. From start-ups to corporate accounts, we represent clients worldwide.

VCA operates more than 590 animal hospitals in the US & Canada. Staffed w/dedicated & compassionate vets and staff to give your pet the very best medical care.

Earth Island Institute grows environmental leadership to support the biological & cultural diversity that sustain the environment

I’m that actor in some of the movies you liked and some you didn’t. Sometimes I’m in pretty good shape, other times I’m not. Hey, you gotta live, you know?

I’m proud to be California’s first dog.

I love hearing from my fans.

A mom who’s proud of her children. A communicator and convener. My mission: to inform, inspire & ignite people to impact their world as #ArchitectsofChange.

Real-time local buzz for live music, parties, shows and more local events happening right now in Santa Monica!

Southern California — this just in. News from L.A. and beyond from the Los Angeles Times. See @latimes & @latimescitybeat for more news.

A non-profit sanctuary that rescues chimpanzees and orangutans.

Help find shelter pets a loving home.

Humane Society International/Canada is the Canadian division of Humane Society International: celebrating animals, confronting cruelty worldwide.

California state director for The Humane Society of the United States Celebrating animals. Confronting cruelty.

CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is the biggest particle physics laboratory in the world.

Live Your Best Life

Building a more humane society. Mobilizing the animal protection movement. Director of Grassroots Organizing for The @HumaneSociety of the United States.

 

Dr. Annie Harvilicz and her team of veterinary medicine professionals are revolutionizing animal healthcare with her forward-thinking integrative approach to health and wellness. The Animal Wellness flagship veterinarian hospital in Venice – Marina del Rey, Los Angeles, is a state-of-the-art clinic designed from the ground up with your pets’ perspective in mind. Learn more here.

Heartbreaking Video of Dolphin and Dead Calf


On July 17, 2012, video footage of a dolphin’s mourning ritual over it’s dead baby calf was released all over the world after photographers captured these heart-wrenching moments off the Guangxi Zhuang coast in China.

Once a dolphin calf is born, sources say that mothers usually push their calf towards the surface of the water to breath. But according to the Daily Mail UK, scientists noticed a large gash across the calf’s belly, leading them to believe it was struck by a boat propeller that could’ve caused its death.  Sadly, instead of a mother trying to give her calf it’s first breaths of air, scientists believe this was actually a mourning ritual.

Philosopher Slavoj Žizek on Animals


Excerpt from SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK:
God Without the Sacred: The Book of Job, the First Critique of Ideology
LIVE from the New York Public Library

Jacques Derrida, of whom I am otherwise rather critical, reported on a kind of primordial scene from his life. After awakening he went naked to his bathroom, where his cat followed him, then the awkward moment occurred. He was standing in front of the cat, which looked at his naked body. Unable to endure this situation, he did something—put a towel around his waist, chasing the cat outside, entering the shower. The cat’s gaze stands for the gaze of the Other. An inhuman gaze, but for this reason all the more the Other’s gaze in all its abyssal impenetrability. Seeing oneself being seen by an animal is an abyssal encounter of the Other’s gaze, since, precisely because we should not simply project onto the animal our inner experience, something is returning the gaze which is impenetrable, radically other. The entire history of philosophy is based, perhaps, upon a disavowal of such an encounter.

I remember a photo of a cat after it was submitted to some lab experiment in a centrifuge. I saw this photo thirty years ago. A cat, its bones half-broken, its skin half-hairless, its eyes helplessly looking into the camera. This is the gaze of the Other disavowed not only by philosophers but by humans as such. Even Levinas, who wrote so much about the helpless Other’s face as the original site of ethical responsibility explicitly denied that an animal’s face can function like this. One of the few honorable exceptions was here, Jeremiah Bentham, who made this simple proposal, “Instead of asking, ‘can animals reason and think? Can they talk?’”—all this humanist enterprises when you triumphantly say, No, they can’t, they just exchange signs, they don’t really talk and so on, we should, according to Bentham, ask, “Can they suffer?”

Human industry alone is continuously causing immense suffering on animals which is systematically disavowed. We know about it but we pretend not to know. Not only laboratory experiments but special regimes, for example, to produce eggs and meat, turning artificial light on and off to shorten the day, use of hormones, and so on. Beaks which are half-blind and barely able to walk, just fattened fast to be slaughtered and so on and so on. The majority of those who visit a chicken factory can no longer eat chicken, and all of us knows—all of us know what goes on there, but this knowledge has to be neutralized, again, so that we can act as if we do not know.

One of the ways to facilitate this ignorance is the Cartesian notion of animal machine. Cartesians already in the seventeenth century were warning people against compassion with animals. They claimed that when we see an animal emitting sounds of pain, we should always bear in mind that these sounds do not express any real inner feeling, since animals do not have souls. These are just sounds generated by a complex mechanism of muscles, bones, fluids, and so on. You can clearly see the origin of these sounds through dissection. The problem is that the notion of animal machine has to end up in La Mettrie’s notion of l’homme machine, of a human man, as a machine. If is one is a fully committed neurobiologist, exactly the same claim can be made about sounds and gestures emitted by humans when they are tortured. There is no separate interior domain of soul where pain is really felt. Such sounds and gestures are simply produced by the complex neurobiological mechanisms that constitute a human body.

So back to the gaze of the cat. What if the perplexity the human looking at the cat sees in the cat’s gaze is the perplexity aroused by the monstrosity of the human being itself? What if what we see in this abyss of the other’s gaze is our own abyss or to quote Racine, a wonderful line from Jean Racine’s Phædre: “Dans ses yeux je vois ma perte écrite,”

“In her eyes I see inscribed my loss.” Gilbert Keith Chesterton proposed such a reversal of perspective. Instead of asking what are animals for us humans, for our experience, we should ask what—or try to imagine what are we humans for animals? In his practically unknown essay “Everlasting Man,” Chesterton makes a wonderful mental experiment along these lines, imagining the monster that man might have seemed at first to the animals around him.

A quote: “The simplest truth about man is that he is a very strange being, almost in the sense of being a stranger on the earth. In all sobriety, he has much more of the external appearance of one bringing alien habits from another land than of a mere growth of this one. He has an unfair advantage and an unfair disadvantage. He cannot sleep in his own skin. He cannot trust his own instincts. He is at once a creator moving miraculous hands and fingers and a kind of cripple. He’s wrapped in artificial bandages called clothes, he’s propped on artificial crutches called furniture. Alone among the animal, man is shaken with the beautiful madness called laughter. As if he had caught sight of some secret in the very shape of the universe hidden from the universe itself. Alone among the animals, man feels the need of averting his thought from the rude realities of his own bodily being, of hiding them as in the presence of some higher possibility which creates the mystery of shame.”

So my point here is that if we try to imagine things like this, maybe this is the first step of wisdom, to extend this logic which was first formulated by Descartes, which is for me the origin of—and I use now the term in its positive sense, multiculturalism. When you find other people’s customs strange, remember how your own customs must appear strange to the same foreigners. We should maybe try just to imagine what kind of monstrosity we were and still are for animals. Maybe this is what we should read in the perplexed animal gaze.

Dr. Annie Harvilicz and her team of veterinary medicine professionals are revolutionizing animal healthcare with her forward-thinking integrative approach to health and wellness. The Animal Wellness flagship veterinarian hospital in Venice – Marina del Rey, Los Angeles, is a state-of-the-art clinic designed from the ground up with your pets’ perspective in mind. Learn more here.

Check out this post about AWC from Yo! Venice!


Situated on the border between Venice and Marina del Rey, Animal Wellness Centers is one of the fastest growing animal healthcare firms in California with a mission to revolutionize the veterinary industry.

Animal Wellness Centers

Over the past decade, in the most advanced animal care settings around the world, Dr. Annie Harvilicz developed the Animal Wellness Approach to animal healthcare, integrating five core elements into a comprehensive, holistic and new-to-world methodology that you can only find at AWC. Nutrition, Behavior, Traditional Medicine, Modern Medicine and Prevention are the key elements to this innovative approach and are consistently applied in each and every appointment you have with an Animal Wellness veterinarian.

Animal Wellness Centers

Click to map!

Animal Wellness Centers also focuses on strengthening human/animal relationships. It is important to celebrate that humans are lucky to have such strong friendships and close bonds with animals, but must be mindful that they are “other nations” and as such, deserve the accompanying respect. We are all together in this “net of life and time,” and we should all strive to make the most of our lives. Animal Wellness Centers’ mission is to promote the quality of life of our companion animals by offering the best possible veterinary care and supporting wellness products and services. To book an appointment, call (310) 450-PETS or visit animalwellnesscenters.com. For more information on AWC, click here!

Thanks to Animal Wellness for sponsoring Yo! Venice! and also for keeping Flora the Yo! Venice! dog healthy and happy! Great place!

Animal Wellness Centers
4053 Lincoln Blvd
Los Angeles 90292

(310) 450-PETS